• New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

  • New Chapbook designs from Kleiner Eisbar

New Books? You Don’t Say!

We’ve been hard at work over the last few months. I’ve been busy coming up with cover designs and text block designs because, as it turns out, everybody doesn’t love blank books, and I think that everybody likes things that look pretty.

The Cover Designs

From the get-go, I knew that I wanted to design something that appealed to me. This might sound selfish, but I’ve found that there tend not to be products designed specifically for me (or perhaps people like me). I tend to like very modern aesthetics that exhibit a little bit of quirk. Geometric designs have always appealed to me as well and happen to be trendy, but I thought that I’d try my hand at it.

Right now we’re releasing four new designs with more coming in the near future. The first (my favorite!) is a design based upon the platonic solids. I’m a huge nerd, so I don’t expect most people to know what the platonic solids are, but they are basically geometric solids that are very symmetrical. They are made of of regular polygons (so equilateral triangles, squares, etc) with the same number of faces meeting at each vertex.

The easiest, and best-known, example of this is the cube. A cube consists of six squares connected. If you stretch a cube out, four sides (faces) are no longer squares, they are rectangles. Since rectangles are not regular polygons, a stretched out cube is not a platonic solid. I happen to love dodecahedra and icosahedra.

The second design is called dots. It may not be the most inspired design, but I like it. Dots are simple and unintrusive yet this design allows you to interact with it. You can fill in the dots to make a kind of pseudo pixel art or you can create your own connect-the-dots drawings. You could create your own paint-by-color type of thing using colored pencils which would be neat. I think that a great use of the dots would be to play Dots and Boxes. I’d like to think that you have all opened up to a random page in your loose-leaf notebooks and drew a crude grid of dots to play this game. If not, think of it like Tic-Tac-Toe but with strategy. On the back cover we illustrate the use of filling in the dots by drawing a heart in the circles.

For those of you not in the know, 42 is the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. If you are still confused because this makes no sense to you—it’s a Douglas Adams quote from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and despite my never having read his books, it is one of the first things Krissy and I bonded over, and how I knew that I really wanted to get to know this girl.

I’ve always thought triangles were special. Growing up with video games, I of course marvelled at the screen. While early consoles used crude (but amazing) images comprised of squares, three-dimensional games (and all 3D rendering) is comprised solely of triangles. In early games, you can see these triangles pretty easily, but animation has evolved to the point that you’d never know that graphics are made up of billions upon billions of triangles (for example, a cube is made up of 12 triangles).

Triangles have become trendy in the last year or so. I suppose it was only a matter of time for people to like them. They are simple and elegant. The 1990s will never be trendy (despite H&M and Forever 21 trying their damndest), but the fundamental building blocks of anything always retain their elegance.

I wanted to make something with triangles, sure, but I wanted to augment it with something else. Keeping with the theme of fundamental, what could be more fundamental than a line segment? Thus, these two building blocks of geometry were fused to make this cover design.

The last design is a seven-segment display found in digital clocks. These can be left alone or fille in with your favorite numbers. The back cover of each of these books comes pre-filled with the number 42. For those of you not in the know, 42 is the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. If you are still confused because this makes no sense to you—it’s a Douglas Adams quote from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and despite my never having read his books, it is one of the first things Krissy and I bonded over, and how I knew that I really wanted to get to know this girl.

Beneath the number 42 on the back cover, you will find two quotes from the aforementioned book. The first, which I already told you is that 42 is the answer to the ultimate question. The second is, “So Long and Thanks for All the Fish!” which is from the beginning of the movie (and so I assume the book as well). Dolphins, being an exceedingly more intelligent species than humans aware of the impending demise of Earth, sing a song proclaiming this very phrase before leaving the planet in the hopes to warn us to leave as well. Naturally, we just think that they are playing and water-dancing for us and Earth is obliterated.

The Text Block Designs

We have four new text block designs, making five in total (because blank is always an option). The first is my favorite and is gridded. This is basically your standard graph paper but less boring. It’s really a cross between normal, lined paper and graph paper. It’s pretty perfect for sketching, and writing with it is a breeze too since it has the standard margin line on the left, and every fourth horizontal line is thicker to make writing easier.

If you’d rather just simple lined paper, we have that too. Plain old lined paper is boring, though, and I wanted to inject a little personality into it so instead of solid lines, the lines are made of dots. Dots are cute.

Finally, we offer two variations of weekly planners. People have been asking us for this, and we’re ready to deliver. The first design is great for planning your week if you run a busy house and need an easy way to keep track of everything. Each page on the left affords you the ability to organize your errands for the week by category: (Groceries, School, Work, Personal, and Home). Each right hand page gives you space for each day of the week.

Our second weekly planner design is less structured. On each spread, the left (verso) page is laid out in your standard weekly layout (Sunday to Saturday). The text is set in black and the rest of the book is set in Cyan. The box that makes up the planner is made of dotted lines which I think look pretty awesome.

The opposing page (recto) is perfect for writing notes for the week and consists of twenty one 1/4″ spaced lines. At the top of the page is room for you to add the month and year, but you can write anything else there too.

Cheers!
—Dennis

Where To Find Them

http://www.etsy.com/listing/112321260/hand-bound-platonic-solids-weekly

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